Carbon Science Planning

Carbon Cycle Science Planning

The Carbon Cycle Science Planning documents provide U.S. funding agencies with information on long-term community-based research priorities for carbon cycle science. The U.S. Carbon Cycle Science Program and CCIWG plan, develop and implement research and funding priorities based on such community feedback in allignment with the USGCRP Strategic Plan and the annual research priorities of the USGCRP. The major documents that have provided input for carbon cycle science planning in the U.S. are listed below.

Carbon Cycle Science Program

Carbon Science Plans

Carbon Cycle Science Planning Working Group Documents

Carbon Cycle Science Working Group (2009-2011)

North American Carbon Program (NACP)
Ocean Carbon and Biogeochemistry Program (OCB)

 

Carbon Cycle Science Program

Carbon Science Plans

The Carbon Cycle Science Plans are non-federal reports developed and published by the community. So far, two decadal science plans have been published, as described below.

A U.S. Carbon Cycle Science Plan (2011): A Report of the Carbon Cycle Science Steering Group and Subcommittee, Anna Michalak, Rob Jackson, Gregg Marland, Chris Sabine, Co-Chairs.

Color photo of front cover

In 2011, the carbon cycle science community in the United States finished its planning process for carbon cycle research for the upcoming decade. This reassessment of the U.S. carbon cycle science priorities was initiated by the U.S. Carbon Cycle Interagency Working Group (CCIWG) and the Carbon Cycle Science Steering Group (CCSSG) in 2008. This planning process culminated in the publication of the new U.S. Carbon Cycle Science Plan. The new Plan is intended to provide guidance for U.S. research efforts on the global carbon cycle for the next decade. The Plan outlines priorities for research in carbon cycle science, including a substantial expansion in the scope of the field. In addition to reaffirming the need for basic research and for continuing the current areas of research in carbon cycle science, the Plan outlines specific recommendations for new priorities. This Plan outlines a strategy for refocusing U.S. carbon cycle research based on the current state of the science. The development of this Plan was led by a committee of 25 active members of the carbon cycle research community. Read the summary of recommendations and View the news release.

 

Color photo of front cover

An earlier report, A U.S. Carbon Cycle Science Plan (1999) (Sarmiento and Wofsy, 1999), reflects the combined knowledge and insight of prominent carbon cyclescientists and well-informed science program managers in both academia and federal government. The vision is that an integrated interdisciplinary science, multi-agency partnership, new and advanced technology and advanced modeling approaches would yield better understanding of the carbon storage, sources and sinks in North America and adjacent ocean basins, and that the research would strengthen the scientific foundation for resource management and policy decisions in numerous areas of public in numerous areas of public interest.

The publication of A U.S. Carbon Cycle Science Plan (2011) (Michalak A., Jackson R., Marland G. and Sabine C., co-chairs) resulted from a new planning effort to update and revise the 1999 plan.

Please contact Gyami Shrestha for hard copies or CDs of the above reports.

Other documents

North American Carbon Program (NACP)

Ocean Carbon and Climate Change (Now Ocean Carbon and Biogeochemistry Program, OCB)

Carbon Cycle Science Planning Working Group Documents

View additional documents.

Carbon Cycle Science Working Group (2009-2011)

Working Group Co-Chairs

Anna Michalak, University of Michigan - Ann Arbor
Robert Jackson, Duke University
Gregg Marland, Oak Ridge National Laboratory
Christopher Sabine, National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration

Working Group Members

Robert Anderson, Lamont-Doherty Earth Observatory
Deborah Bronk, Virginia Institute of Marine Science
Kenneth Davis, Pennsylvania State University
Ruth DeFries, Columbia University
Lisa Dilling, University of Colorado
Andy Jacobson, National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration
Matthew Kahn, University of California - Los Angeles
Steve Lohrenz, University of Southern Mississippi
Galen McKinley, University of Wisconsin - Madison
Chip Miller, National Aeronautics and Space Administration
Berrien Moore, University of New Hampshire
Dennis Ojima, The Heinz Center for Science, Economics, and the Environment
James Randerson, University of California - Irvine
Steven Running, University of Montana
Brent Sohngen, Ohio State University
Pieter Tans, National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration
Peter Thornton, Oak Ridge National Laboratory
Steven Wofsy, Harvard University
Ning Zeng, University of Maryland

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This page last updated 02/04/2014 - 17:24